Confessions of a Gadget Addict

confessions blog

I’ve loved monologues since studying Shakespeare’s Richard III. So, in a complete change of pace from my usual articles and segments, I have tried my (completely amateur) hand at my own monologue.

So what topic did I choose for my performance art? Looking around me in my room, it was pretty damn obvious – my predilection for all thing tech.

Although tongue in cheek, as the saying goes, in every joke there is a an ounce of truth. When I looked at the amount of time, energy and emotion I pour into my gadgets, it’s quite discomforting to realise just how all encompassing this obsession can be.

And interestingly, some of the comments I’ve received on the video have been people who either can identify with my thoughts, or know someone who “needs help”. Maybe you know someone like this yourself?

With no further delay, here is my performance piece, entitled, appropriately, “Confessions of a Gadget Addict”.

Touchless Google Voice Search on Nexus 5

google voice search

Voice control has been the holy grail of computing for many years, and smartphones are the perfect platform to see if this control system could actually deliver real benefits to users. Google has now released touchless Google Voice Search, and the first model that it appears on is its own Nexus 5.

The big question for voice control and voice recognition is not only how well the software can pick up and understand words, but the overall question or command that the user is trying to convey.

The first part of Google Voice Search is the ability to always be listening out for your command to activate search, in this case using the term “OK, Google”. This can be said while you’re on any home screen, and will bring up the voice search dialogue box.

From there, the test we did was not to trick Google Voice Search, but to use plain terms that we might use in everyday situations. After all, the point of intuitive voice control is not to have to learn any formats or sentence structures, but to simply recognise and comprehend the meaning of the command or search query.

This is exactly where I have been very impressed with Google Voice Search. Aside from the touchless control, which is still limited in that you have to be on a home screen, the questions I posed were not always that direct.

For example, when I asked Google Voice Search if I needed to wear sunglasses, I didn’t say “is it sunny” – Google had to work out the context for my question.

The other conversational aspect of the new Google Voice Search is the ability to follow up with new questions that don’t use all the original question information – for example, I asked “how deep is the deepest ocean” and, and after the answer followed up with “which ocean is that?” and Google Voice Search understood.

But instead of telling you about it, here’s a short segment on Google Voice Search with some cool and sometimes challenging voice-based queries.

 

 

 

Microsoft Announces Windows 8 Surface Tablet

In a surprise announcement this morning, Microsoft announced it would be manufacturing its own Windows 8 tablet, known as the surface.

The Windows 8 Surface tablet is only 9.3mm thin, with a full magnesium case and weighing 576 grams, this is the first PC product that Microsoft will be offering outside of its traditional PC manufacturing partners.

Along with Windows 8 on board, apps such as Netflix will be preloaded, and it will include expected features such as semantic zoom, which allows a two finger gesture to show the entire Metro layout.

The Windows 8 Surface tablet has a built in stand that Microsoft claims does not add any thickness to the tablet. An optional cover converts into a touch type keyboard for productivity sessions, with the keyboard turning on and glowing when clicked onto the Surface.

Windows Surface Tablet

Microsoft enters the PC Hardware game with Surface for Windows 8.

Ports on the Surface include USB 2, HDMI, front and rear cameras, plus Gorilla Glass 2 protecting the Full HD display.

The Windows 8 Surface tablet will come in both Windows RT, which restricts apps to the Windows Marketplace. The Windows RT model will come in 32GB and 64GB capacities and powered by nVidia ARM processors.

Surface for Windows 8 Pro will be powered by Intel Core Processors and will provide the full computing experience including third party programs. These will be released in 64GB and 128GB capacities, and priced along Ultrabook PC lines.

The Windows RT model will be available from the launch of Windows 8, with the Windows 8 Pro model expected around 3 months later.

 

Asus Transformer Infinity First Look

We’ve been following the Asus line of Transformer products ever since they were released, from the first Honeycomb tablet to include a keyboard dock, to the Slider, and then to the Transformer Prime, which set new benchmarks for the Google OS line of tablets. Now, we have the latest model - the Asus Transformer Infinity.

Asus Transformer Infinity Tablet
Anyone up for a quad core high definition super bright super-slim tablet?

 

This release is an important one, not just for Asus, who have been flexing their innovative muscles in the Android tablet domain since the introduction of the category, but for the tablet market as a whole. Why? The Asus Transformer Infinity can truly go up against the new iPad, the incumbent market leader in this category, and offer a substantial answer to all of the iPad’s propositions.

As you’ll see in the following videos, the Asus Transformer Infinity has great hardware, software, a robust operating environment and is supported by a maturing app store in the form of Google Play. Asus have addressed areas like wireless connection issues and GPS performance to produce a tablet all-rounder.

Asus Transformer Infinity GPS
The Asus Transformer Infinity has a plastic strip on the top rear to maximise GPS performance.

 

The hardware component of the Asus Transformer Infinity is far from flimsy, with a metal casing ensuring no flexing or bending on any part of the device. Despite the screen upgrade (which we’ll get to in a moment), the tablet on its own does not gain any weight, staying at 586 grams, exactly the same as its Prime predecessors.

The Asus Transformer Infinity also retains the ports that made the Transformer series so attractive, with Micro-HDMI and Micro-SD slots on the tablet body, and a further full size USB port and SD Card slot on the keyboard dock component.

Asus Transformer Infinity with keyboard
The usefulness of a tablet with a keyboard cannot be fully appreciated until you have to type an full length article about one.

 

Inside the Infinity is an upgraded quad core Tegra 3 chip, quoted at 1.6GHz but benchmarked at 1.9GHz. The OS is snappy, with Android functions and App commands all working unhesitatingly.

Just in case we thought we were being a little biased because of our fondness for the Transformer line up, we thought it prudent to quantify this and to see just how the Asus Transformer Infinity could handle the pressures of the job compared to another fairly popular tablet… say, the iPad?

This is where we became REALLY intrigued. Not only did the Infinity beat the iPad in many benchmark tests, but some by a huge margin. The graphics test, which saw the Prime pale beside the iPad in our earlier experiences, still showed Apple to have a command in that particular area. When it came to browsing, Java script handling and computational processing, the Asus Transformer Infinity swept the field.

The other big news was the high definition display. The big visual test was to see (literally) if there was a marked difference in the Infinity’s screen and the iPad’s highly praised display. And yes, there was a huge difference – the Asus Transformer Infinity was way brighter. Other than that, at normal viewing proximity, both screens delivered great detail and clarity. At massive zoomed enlargement, the iPad didn’t stray from its perfected image, and the Infinity showed some signs of pixelation. But that’s not how we view a tablet in normal circumstances.

If we seem a little lathered up in our praise of the Asus Transformer Infinity, it’s because this release shines a bright light to a competitive market across ecosystem platforms, where hardware vendors are creating innovative new products. As we always say, competition is a great thing for the industry and the smartphone, tablet and Ultrabook markets are hotbeds of design and technology fusions.

Asus Transformer Infinity lid closed
The future of mobile computing in our hands?

 

If you have any questions, please leave them below and we’ll find out the answers for you.

Until next time!

Acer Aspire S5 Ultrabook First Look

Acer are developing a reputation for delivering the goods when it comes to being first, or close to first to market in new categories. After being the first with an Android tablet last year, and the first with an Ultrabook later in 2011, you can’t fault the Taiwanese computer company for giving new products a go. Now in June 2012, Acer are about to release the successor to the S3 Ultrabook, called the Acer Aspire S5.

 

The Acer Asipre S5 is noteworthy for a few reasons. Firstly, it features Intel’s latest 3rd-Generation Core Processor, which we’ll be sure to benchmark. The one we had our hands on had the latest dual core i7 chip, which while not quad core as its larger siblings in standard notebooks are, is the best processor seen in an Ultrabook so far.

Secondly, the USB ports have been upgraded to USB 3. We always saw the absence of USB 3 as a bit of a disappointment on the original version, but that has been rectified on the Acer Aspire S5 now. And there’s two of them to boot.

Thirdly, the Thunderbolt port is an important inclusion for high speed transfers, and one connection that is extremely rare in retail notebooks up to this point. While many Macs have has the luxury of Thunderbolt for a while, Windows machines have yet to catch up to this connection standard, and once again Acer have come to the fore to offer this port on the Acer Aspire S5. For retailers that don’t yet sell Thunderbolt accessories, the introduction of Thunderbolt may pave the way for a great range offering by Thunderbolt-compatible vendors.

Fourthly, Acer have tried something not yet seen in any other Ultrabook, and certainly not in other notebooks generally – a retractable dock that hides the main connections when not in use. This has the added benefit of slimming down the Acer Aspire S5 to a respectable 15mm when the dock is hidden, making it one of the slimmest Ultrabooks around.

Acer Aspire S5 Ultrabook

The Acer Aspire S5 Ultrabook features 3rd Gen Intel Core Processors, Thunderbolt, USB 3 and a retractable dock. I Looked for a kitchen sink but alas, couldn't find one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The dock contains the HDMI, USB3 and Thunderbolt ports. When there is a port being used, the retractable function is disabled, saving your cables (and the Ultrabook) from any damage.

The Acer Aspire S5 is a great statement about taking the original idea of the Ultrabook and tweaking it with some innovative features such as the Thunderbolt port and the retractable dock. With the announcement of the touch enabled S7 Ultrabook at Computex, it’s clear Acer have no intention of letting creativity and innovation slip by the wayside in what is a very competitive PC market.

Asus Padfone, Padfone Station and Stylus – First Look

Ever since the first Transformer was unleashed to an unsuspecting Android community, we’ve been keeping an eye on the innovative releases from Asus. We’ve seen the Eee Pad Slider, the Transformer Prime, and have seen the TF700 in its prototype format at the CES earlier this year. Now, this Asus Padfone first look is another feather in the cap for the Taiwanese PC company as it ramps up its tablet range.

Asus Padfone - the smartphone that transforms into a tablet, which then transforms into a keyboard driven mobile product. No shortage of innovation here.

As part of the Asus Padfone first look, we have an unboxing video, which shows all the gear that comes bundled with both the Padfone and the large screen Padfone station - come back to see this in a few hours.

For those familiar with the delicious family feast consisting of a chicken stuffed inside a duck stuffed into a turkey, the Asus Padfone does feel a little like a technology turducken. Each added element adds a little more functionality but also obviously pads out (forgive the pun) the Asus Padfone’s dimensions and weight. Here’s the overview segment that we think gets across all the cool things about the Padfone:

As you could see, the Padfone is a pretty stock standard ICS build in a nice Ultrabook/Transformer Prime style case. The more I use the native Android 4 environment on mobiles, the more I like it, and the same applies to the Asus Padfone, which is light, comfortable in the hand and should have enough grunt to run whatever Android apps you throw at it, courtesy of the Snapdragon dual core 1.5GHz processor.

Then we have the Asus Padfone Station, which is the 10.1″ inch screen that comes to life when you insert the Padfone into the cradle in the back. The screen looks just like any other Asus ICS tablet product with the familiar home page graphics and Asus-specific widgets. The trick here is to remember that this isn’t a tablet, it’s just a screen displaying the output from the Padfone, which has all the grunt.

The next trick up the Padfone’s sleeve is to then connect the Padfone Station to the Asus Padfone Dock, which is essentially the keyboard dock that we have come to know and love from Asus. With all the same Android shortcuts as on other Transformer keyboards, a second SD card slot after the Micro-SD slot on the Padfone, and the ability to pump out well-typed messages and documents, you can see that Asus have pulled no punches to take this concept as far as it can, including a stylus that doubles as a bluetooth headset.

The Asus Padfone is a superb example of an idea that could well have stayed in the design and R & D labs. Kudos to Asus for showing just what is possible in the Android environment. Without taking away anything from this concept, one must be wondering what wonderful toys are lurking in their Windows 8 testing room.

Our local contacts have left the Asus Padfone with us for a few more days, so there is an opportunity to test or demonstrate a few more things for you and create more content around your feedback. Let us know what other details you’re interested in and we’ll come up with a few more segments around your comments.

Look forward to hearing from you!

Windows 8 Release Date Getting Closer with Consumer Preview Launch

This Wednesday in Barcelona, Microsoft will be releasing their Consumer Preview of Windows 8, giving users a taste of what the latest version of Windows will be offering. Although an exact Windows 8 release date hasn’t been announced, the timing of the beta version, as it is more commonly known, does indicate a possible release around September/October this year.

The launch of the Windows 8 Consumer Preview at the Mobile World Congress is telling, as it appears to be in line with the ramping up of the Windows environment across many device types. This includes smartphones and tablets in addition to the traditional PC and notebook market. Although Windows 7 has appeared in some touch screen tablets, these have been mostly commercial models and retail versions have not sold in massive numbers. This should change with Windows 8.

The Windows 8 Release Date firms up with the Consumer Preview announcement.

The next big milestone in the Windows 8 development is the Consumer Preview, but how far away is an official Windows 8 release date?

As we’ve already seen on the Nokia Lumia 800 Windows phone, the latest Windows OS for Smartphones is powerful and easy to use. The developer preview of Windows 8 also showed the Metro-style approach, moving away from the traditional desktop environment as we’ve known it for many years. (read our report on the Windows Phone from Nokia here.)

The tile-style grouping of programs and apps works well across the vertical swiping of the smaller smartphone screen, and the horizontal real estate of a widescreen display. How Microsoft intends to lock this down for the Windows 8 release date will be made much clearer as the Consumer Preview is distributed.

The Metro store is also expected to be opened in line with the Consumer Preview. These apps will probably be free previews ahead of the official Windows 8 release date. Apps would then be available to purchase as they are on the Apple App Store and Android Marketplace.

There is plenty of speculation about the final look and feel of Windows 8, including the removal of the iconic “Start” button. If this proves to be true, the Windows 8 release date will mark the end of a love-hate relationship with a desktop OS the world has used for decades. Microsoft could possibly re-invent Windows as a superpower OS integrated into people’s lives in business, leisure and social communication.

[Do you have friends who might find this article useful? Please use the floating social bar  on your right and send this article to your friends via Facebook, twitter, Google+ and Linked In. Your support is always appreciated...Thanks!] 

Nokia Lumia 800 Windows Mobile Phone in Action

While at the CES this year we had a quick play with the Nokia Lumia 800 Windows mobile phone. Even in that short period of time, we were very impressed with the mobile operating system that Microsoft had developed, and were eager to get a unit for an in-depth look. The Lumia 800 will be available in Australia for the first time in March. (for more coverage from the Consumer Electronics Show, see our CES section here.)

As we’ve mentioned previously, Window 8 will be the real beginning for Microsoft’s foray into the mobile ecosystem, and if Windows Mobile 7.5 is any indication, it will be a strong contender against Android and Apple, if the total solution is executed well. By that I mean the hardware, embedded OS and app market support. (For our thoughts on what CES may lead to this year, click here.)

For now we have the Lumia 800 to build that case for Windows Smartphone. Here’s what we thought of the phone in our video segment:

There was a lot to like about the Nokia Lumia 800 Windows mobile phone. The physical shape and weight were very comfortable, and I thought the inclusion of the rubber form-fitting case was a nice touch. I actually wouldn’t use the phone without it as it doesn’t take away from the look and does add grip to the daily use.

At 800 x 480 pixels, the 3.7” screen is certainly not the highest resolution, but being AMOLED what was on the screen was easily readable. The Gorilla Glass added further confidence in the robustness of the display.

We also liked the layout of the buttons – all on the right hand side and intuitive once used a few times. The magnetic cover for the charging and connecting port seemed to be a little finicky, but the cover added to the overall design. The use of Micro SIM might make it easy for iPhone users to switch over without the need for a new SIM card. Perhaps that was one consideration when building this phone’s hardware specs.

Nokia Lumia 800 Windows Mobile Phone

The Nokia Lumia 800 Windows Mobile Phone is a strong example of where Microsoft is headed with Windows this year in the mobile and smartphone category.

Instead of widgets, each tile has a dynamic status attached and will display social updates, unopened or unanswered communication, and other software/hardware statuses like Wi-Fi.

Complete customisation can be achieved and would be the key to a successful home screen on the Nokia Lumia 800 Windows mobile phone. All apps can be pinned to the home screen and arranged in whatever order you need them in.

One of the biggest hooks for users will be the People Hub. This is where it all comes together and makes your phone the social aggregator of all your networking tendrils, helping to group people according to their relationship with you and displaying updated feeds for each group that you create.

Microsoft’s search engine Bing will be ramped up further by its inclusion in the Windows OS. They’ve made it easy to access from the lock screen  and different methods of search are instantly available: voice, text or music snippets.  Barcodes and QR codes can also be read using the Bing search.

It was refreshing to use this Nokia Lumia 800 Windows mobile phone. The responsiveness of the OS and the absolute ease of use, along with the social focus, put this phone and the Windows Phone OS in high regard over here.

[Do you have friends who you think might find this article useful? Then please use the floating social bar  on this page now and send this article to your friends via Facebook, twitter, Google+ and Linked In. Your support is always appreciated.] 

It’s by no means perfect yet, and after using it on a daily basis for a short period, there were a few characteristics we found that hopefully will be refined with updates down the track. Being an evolutionary product by nature, the OS is sure to improve over time and with user feedback.

There aren’t any native shortcuts for regularly used settings, like a Bluetooth or Wi-Fi toggle switch. I did find an app on the Microsoft Marketplace though,which was free and seems to work quite well.  There also doesn’t seem to be support for a simple thing such as a screenshot at the moment, which I find myself using all the time.

One of the most noticeable omissions right now is the lack of a function to convert your phone into a personal hotspot so you can connect other internet devices. And Flash has not been deployed on the mobile browser either, although not a huge issue with HMTL5 taking over and the world of plug-ins fading fast.

Over the air updates aren’t active on Nokia Lumia 800 Windows mobile phone yet, either. There is actually an alert that comes to you over the air, but that is only a notice for you to install and use the Zune software on a PC to apply any OS update. Given both Android and iOS both apply updates OTA, this takes a point away from Windows.

These aren’t hardware restrictions, and could all be addressed through system updates. Given that these features would probably be expected on a decent smartphone in 2012, I’m keen to see how quickly Nokia and Microsoft address these omissions.

As a first iteration, it’s the strongest Windows Smartphone offering yet. The focus on the relationship-based groups and social network integration is extremely compelling, and the intuitive and well-designed mobile environment makes it a true competitor in the battle of the ecosystems this year.

Apple and Android, meet your match. Microsoft might be a little late to the party, but they’ve bought a big bag of goodies along to make friends.

How entrenched are you in the ecosystem you currently use? Is the feature set of this Windows Phone convincing enough to move you across? Let us know your thoughts in the comments area below.

Toshiba Android Tablet AT200: A Closer Look

After the popularity and interest in our video (that can be found below) and the article on how Toshiba have stopped selling the AT200 in Australia, which you can read here Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 Ends Before it Begins, we thought we’d take a closer look at Toshiba’s new slimline tablet, as it will still be available around the world for some time.

Toshiba Android Tablet AT200

Just released globally, the Toshiba AT200 sets new standards in lightness and thinness for tablet devices.

Toshiba love being able to set new records and try new products that are a little left of centre.  Although some products aren’t successful in the mainstream, like the Libretto W100 Dual touch screen device, they do point to a company willing to take some risks to push the envelope.

The Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 is such a product. To call it the Ultrabook of the tablet world might be taking it a little far, but it does seem to go hand in hand with theZ830 as a companion in the thin and light mobile computing category, read that article here Toshiba Satellite Z830 Ultrabook First Look . At only 535 grams and 7.7mm it is currently the world’s thinnest and lightest tablet, matching the boasts of its Ultrabook sibling.

The overall design is of two slivers of silver being sandwiched together, with a black line running the entire way around the middle of the edge, except for the buttons and ports. It’s a stylish design and seems to be inspired in some part by its Ultrabook, with no tapering, just a consistent thickness all around.

The back plate has a metal finish with the Toshiba logo embedded, just in case there was any question as to what brand this eye catching tablet was. The back panel also holds the 5 megapixel camera. The front camera is 2MP.

What a great business model Gorilla Glass has now, becoming the go-to company for scratch and impact resistant display. The AT200’s 1280 x 800 display is protected by the Corning company’s mobile/tablet product.

Toshiba have kept the controls and ports very minimal but still manage to provide all the necessary outputs to satisfy most needs. The connection on the bottom of the tablet is for power and connection to a PC via USB, and the proprietary cable comes in the box.

It probably would have been easier to avoid duplicating the onboard connectivity of their previous 10.1”, the AT100, but they’ve gone all out and retained a full set of outputs.

The left hand side contains all the connections I mentioned earlier – headphone jack, micro USB, Micro HDMI and Micro SD. It is interesting that Toshiba can provide such a comprehensive connection suite in a product with such dimensions, beating both the iPad 2 and Tab 10.1, both of which offer only a single proprietary connection that can be accessed with various add-on cables.

Interestingly, the Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 uses a Texas Instruments dual core processor, which is comparable to the Tegra 2 or A5 processor used in iPads and other Android tablets. This may mean that another tablet with Tegra 3 may be on the drawing board down the track.

[Do you have friends who you think might find this article useful? Then please use the floating social bar  on this page now and send this article to your friends via Facebook, twitter, Google+ and Linked In. Your support is always appreciated.] 

Software-wise, the Toshiba is still rocking the Android 3.2 Honeycomb OS, and no word on upgrades just yet. Given the amount of exposure Ice Cream Sandwich is getting now, read our article here Android 4 Ice Cream Sandwich on a Tablet. I’m sure this question of ICS upgrade will be on the lips of any prospective AT200 owner.

In line with their pedigree in the commercial and enterprise space, rather than focusing on entertainment, Toshiba have included a few productivity apps. This includes Thinkfree Office for Word, Excel and Powerpoint compatibility; Splashtop for remote desktop access, a file manager (which surprisingly some tablets still don’t have out of the box), the popular Evernote and McAfee security.

When you look at the types of apps on board and the styling of the Toshiba Android Tablet AT200, you do get a sense that this is more of an executive’s secondary or third device rather than a casual gaming and entertainment tablet. The absence of Ice Cream Sandwich may turn some users off, but we’ll ask Toshiba for an update on that and come back with details when available.

In case you missed it the first time around, here’s our video of the Toshiba Android Tablet AT200:

What do you think of the AT200 from Toshiba?

Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 Ends Before It Begins

Toshiba Australia very kindly sent us a shiny new Android tablet to play with and we produced a segment, as seen below, and liked a lot about this new tablet. The Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 is the thinnest and lightest 10.1” tablet in the market, beating all other tablets on thinness and weight. The AT200 has its own look and feel that separates it from its competitors.

However, late Friday we were informed that as of this week, the Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 was going “End of Life” in Australia. This meant no more units would be brought into the country to sell.

Coincidentally (or perhaps not), Samsung also announced a fairly sizeable price reduction across the board for its 10.1 Galaxy Tab range, which now puts it at $100 under Apple’s iPad, you can read that article here Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 Price Drop .

The AT200 was originally pegged at $579 for its 16GB Wi-Fi only model, which would have put it directly up against the iPad, and $100 more than the repositioned Samsung.

The Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 was, on paper, a pretty likeable machine. It weighed only 535 grams and was 7.7mm thin, eclipsing any other current tablet. Like its predecessor, it managed to retain a comprehensive set of connections -– headphone jack, Micro USB, Micro HDMI and Micro SD.

Toshiba Android Tablet AT200

The Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 offered great connectivity and a sharp looking body.

It also had a pretty inclusive set of software on its Honeycomb OS. This included Thinkfree Office, Splashtop for remote desktop access, a file manager, Evernote for spontaneous information gathering and McAfee security. One uncertain factor was when it would be upgraded to Android 4.0.

Our understanding is that the Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 is still alive and well in other regions around the world, so it appears to be a local decision not to continue this model on this continent. The Australian market is sometimes used as a litmus test for new products and technology for vendors as it’s fairly isolated and we’re a proud bunch of early adopters. This could indicate a subtle shift in Toshiba’s overall strategy in the tablet space.

[Do you have friends who you think might find this article useful? Then please use the floating social bar  on this page now and send this article to your friends via Facebook, twitter, Google+ and Linked In. Your support is always appreciated.] 

So where could Toshiba be heading, given this was a benchmark product in form factor at the very least? My initial guess is a ramp up to develop a strong Windows 8 tablet as part of its overall Windows ecosystem offer.

Toshiba released a touch screen all-in-one model last year, so they now have desktops, notebooks, Ultrabooks, and potentially tablets that would put them in a healthy position to offer Windows 8 across virtually all device types, except for mobile phones. Given Toshiba’s strength in the Australian market, such a strategy could be extremely beneficial.

After all, Android has evolved from the mobile platform whereas Windows has developed from a desktop/server platform, giving it a very different set of development challenges. Given Toshiba’s long history supporting Windows as its dominant operating system, there is no doubt they will come out with a strong offer at the launch of Windows 8.

The Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 cancellation and Samsung’s price move are two significant news events in one weekend for tablets. We are still to see the iPad 3 resolve into a real product from the conjecture and rumour that is feeding the hype before the announcement.

It’s going to be a real interesting few months for the tablet industry.  We will see more Tegra 3 products released, ICS deployed and upgraded on more machines, and the new iPad 3 awake from its secret slumber. In the second half of the year, Microsoft will make its move with partners like Toshiba champing at the bit to get into the market with Windows 8 on multiple hardware options.

Watch the video below or read our article on the Toshiba Android Tablet AT200 a Closer Look for more information.

Does Toshiba’s announcement change your mind about Android, and are you waiting for Windows 8 on a tablet?